I'm no one. I'm nothing.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from goflyakate  275 notes
goflyakate:

demons:

Marguerite Higgins (Sept 3 1920 - Jan 3 1966) was an American reporter and renown war correspondent who covered the Second World War, the Korean War and the war in Vietnam. She attended the University of California and Berkely, where in 1941 she graduated with a B.A. degree in French and received a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia University. Well ahead of her time, Higgins worked for the New York Herald Tribune for two years before finally persuading them to allow her to become a war correspondent in 1944. After that, she was in London and Paris before being reassigned to Germany in March 1945. It was there she witnessed the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in April of that year and received the US Army campaign ribbon for her assistance of capturing and arresting SS guards. In the immediate post-war Germany, Higgins covered the Nuremberg trials and then the Soviet Union’s blockade of Berlin. In 1950, when the Korean War broke out, she was the first war correspondent in the country. Despite her resume and experience from the Second World War, Higgins was ordered out of the country by General Walton Walker, who argued that “women did not belong at the front” and that “the military had no time to worry about making separate accommodations for them”.  Seeing no other option, Higgins made a personal appeal to General Walker’s superior officer, General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur subsequently sent a telegram to the New York Herald Tribune that read:

Ban on women correspondents in Korea has been lifted. Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone.

As a result, Higgins work during the Korean War was some of the best seen in war journalism. So much so that her work won her the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 for international reporting, making her the first woman to do so. She shared the award with five previous male correspondents. In the 1960s, after covering the Vietnam War for several years, she contracted the tropical disease known as leishmaniasis. Marguerite died at the age of 45 in January 1966.

"Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone."
The “including you, General Walker, you dumbass” is presumably implied.

goflyakate:

demons:

Marguerite Higgins (Sept 3 1920 - Jan 3 1966) was an American reporter and renown war correspondent who covered the Second World War, the Korean War and the war in Vietnam. She attended the University of California and Berkely, where in 1941 she graduated with a B.A. degree in French and received a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia University.

Well ahead of her time, Higgins worked for the New York Herald Tribune for two years before finally persuading them to allow her to become a war correspondent in 1944. After that, she was in London and Paris before being reassigned to Germany in March 1945. It was there she witnessed the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in April of that year and received the US Army campaign ribbon for her assistance of capturing and arresting SS guards. In the immediate post-war Germany, Higgins covered the Nuremberg trials and then the Soviet Union’s blockade of Berlin.

In 1950, when the Korean War broke out, she was the first war correspondent in the country. Despite her resume and experience from the Second World War, Higgins was ordered out of the country by General Walton Walker, who argued that “women did not belong at the front” and that “the military had no time to worry about making separate accommodations for them”.

Seeing no other option, Higgins made a personal appeal to General Walker’s superior officer, General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur subsequently sent a telegram to the New York Herald Tribune that read:

Ban on women correspondents in Korea has been lifted. Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone.

As a result, Higgins work during the Korean War was some of the best seen in war journalism. So much so that her work won her the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 for international reporting, making her the first woman to do so. She shared the award with five previous male correspondents.

In the 1960s, after covering the Vietnam War for several years, she contracted the tropical disease known as leishmaniasis. Marguerite died at the age of 45 in January 1966.

"Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone."

The “including you, General Walker, you dumbass” is presumably implied.

Reblogged from zaraphena  113,581 notes
Reblogged from very-merry  2,804 notes

One helen is sufficient good looks to launch one thousand ships, and to cause the destruction by fire of an entire city. The objective standards of Ship Launching and Arson may now be used to analyze feminine beauty. […] The table below will be of assistance:

- Attohelen (ah) 10-18 helens: Light up a Lucky While Strolling past a Shipyard

- Femtohelen (fh) 10-15 helens: Burn a Dinner Candle & Spit a Toothpick into a Water Glass

- Picohelen (ph) 10-12 helens: Barbecue a Couple of Steaks & Toss an Inner Tube Into the Pool

- Nanohelen (nh) 10-9 helens: Send the Old Man on a Canoe Trip & Build a Good Roaring Blaze in the Fireplace

- Microhelen (µh) 10-6 helens: Christen a Motor Boat & Start a Grass Fire

- Millihelen (mh) 10-3 helens: Launch One Homeric Warship & Burn Down a House

- Centihelen (ch) 10-2 helens: Incinerate a City Block & Launch Christopher Columbus’ Entire Fleet: The “Niña” (40 tons), the “Pinta” (50 tons) and the “Santa Maria” (100 tons)

- Decihelen (dh) 10-1 helens: Torch the Central Business District of Oakland, California, & Launch the Clipper Ship “Flying Cloud” (1783 tons)

- Helen (h): Raze One City & Launch the WWI US Battleship “Delaware” (20,000 tons)

- Dekahelen (dah) 10 helens: Oversee the Incendiary Bombing of Ten Cities and Launch the Aircraft Carriers “Theodore Roosevelt” (91,487 tons) and “Dwight D. Eisenhower (91,487 tons)

- Hectohelen (hh) 102 helens: Instigate a Major Modern Conflict & Launch the Oil Platform “Stratfjord B” (with ballast, 899,360 tons), the Supertanker “Seawise Giant” (624,038 dead- weight tonnage); the Oil/Ore Carrier “World Gala” (282,460 dwt tonnage) and the Bulk-Ore Tanker “Hoei Maru” (208,000 dwt tonnage)

- Kilohelen (kh) 103 helens: Launch the Equivalent of One Million Greek Warships & Spark a Nuclear Confrontation

- Megahelen (Mh) 106 helens: Launch the Equivalent of One Billion Greek Warships & Blow Up the World

- Gigahelen (Gh) 109 helens: Launch the Equivalent of One Trillion Greek Warships & Destroy the Solar System

- Terahelen (Th) 1012 helens: Launch the Equivalent of One Thousand Trillion Greek Warships and Make Serious Inroads on the Welfare of the Galaxy

It is to be hoped that beauty exceeding the Hectohelen class evades even the most ambitious.

By the Table of Helens and Equivalents, from “ON THE INEFFICIENCY OF BEAUTY CONTESTS, & A SUGGESTION FOR THEIR MODERNIZATION." by David Lance Goines. (via penthesileas)